Military Schools In Utah

Is the behavior of your child causing chaos in your family life?

Have you seen your child display any of the self-destructive behaviors listed below?

  • Drug Abuse
  • Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD)
  • Lack of Motivation
  • Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD)
  • Abrupt Change in Personality
  • Adoption Issues
  • Uncontrollable Anger
  • Manipulative
  • Skips School
  • Lying – Stealing
  • You can’t make me, attitude
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Legal Problems
  • Family Conflict
  • Cutting – Self-Harm
  • Substance Abuse
  • Low Self-Esteem
  • Alcohol Abuse
  • Fighting – Violence
  • Can’t Keep Friends
  • Grades Have Fallen
  • School Suspensions
  • Gang Involvement
  • Reactive Attachment Disorder
  • Conduct Disorder
  • Runs Away
  • Depression
  • Oppositional Defiant Disorder
  • Sexually Active
  • Blatant Disregard of Rules
  • Hanging With the Wrong Crowd
  • Attempted or Threats of Suicide
  • Bullying
  • Smoking
  • I hate you, attitude
  • Poor Emotional Control
  • Learning Disabilities
  • Never at Fault
  • Eating Disorder (Anorexia, Bulimia)
  • Withdrawn From Family

 

There are such a wide variety of military schools in Utah and throughout the rest of the country that it can be hard to know which school is the best. It is important to keep in mind that the best school for your child may not be the best school for your neighbor’s child. At Parent Resources, we understand this, and we work hard to help all of our clients find the school that is truly the best for them and their child. To help you find the best school, we offer free consultation phone calls where we answer all of the questions that you may have.

Over the years, we have learned that the reasons that parents look into military schools are varied. Some parents want to prepare their child for a career in the military. Other parents are looking for a school that offers more structure and discipline for their children. Many parents, however, are looking for a school that can offer their child help for their emotional issues. Many children who act out are actually acting out in response to a low self esteem, and if you believe that this is the case with your child, it is important to ask the school how they can help you with this issue.

You should ask the school if they offer therapy. Do they offer group therapy or individual therapy? If they offer group therapy, is it coed? Will your child be with children of the same age or different ages? If your child is taking medication for their problems, will the school continue to allow them to take the medication? If the therapist on staff thinks that your child needs a different prescription, how will they deal with that? Will they contact you before giving your child medication? How will they ensure that your child is taking his or her medication? If you are not treating your child with medication, will they allow your child to address their emotional issues through diet? Can they ensure that your child will only eat foods of which you approve?

These questions are so important to ask. Yet, it can feel cumbersome to call every school in which you are interested. At Parent Resources, we work hard to make this process easy for you. We offer you support through this process, and we are willing to answer any questions that you have.